Diversity,Equity,Inclusion_1st_Edition

This first edition publication provides information, expertise, and resources relating to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

First Edition

By: Shatomi Luster-Edward, Ed.D.

A T T R I B U T I ON S

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, First Edition

Copyright © Luster-Edward, S. 2019, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0). Published by Extension Foundation.

ISBN: 978-1-7340417-0-5

Original Publish Date: April 2019. Republished April 8 th , 2022

Citations for this publication may be made using the following:

Luster, S. ed. Diversity, Equity and Inclusion eFieldbook . 1st ed., Kansas City: Extension Foundation, 2019.

Producer: Ashley S. Griffin

Technical Implementer: Retta Ritchie-Holbrook and Rose Hayden-Smith

Welcome to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, 1 st edition, a publication created for the Cooperative Extension Service and published by the Extension Foundation. We welcome feedback and suggested resources for this eFieldbook, which could be included in any subsequent versions. This work is supported by New Technologies for Agriculture Extension grant no. 2015-41595-24254 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

For more information please contact: Extension Foundation c/o Bryan Cave LLP One Kansas City Place

1200 Main Street, Suite 3800 Kansas City, MO 64105-2122 https://extension.org

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T A B L E O F CON T E N T S

Attributions ............................................................................................................................................. 2

Table of Contents..................................................................................................................................... 3

What is Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI)? .......................................................................................... 4 Welcome............................................................................................................................................................................. 4 How Can You Use This Publication to Promote DEI?.......................................................................................................... 5 About Us ................................................................................................................................................. 6 Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Chairs................................................................................................................................ 6 Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Organizing Committee ..................................................................................................... 7 Frameworks........................................................................................................................................... 10 What’s in a Framework? ................................................................................................................................................... 10 DEI Competency Areas ........................................................................................................................... 11 What are Competencies? ................................................................................................................................................. 11 Understanding Implicit Bias .............................................................................................................................................. 12 Microaggression Development and Understanding......................................................................................................... 15 Cultural Competency ........................................................................................................................................................ 17 Promotion of Civility ......................................................................................................................................................... 19 Social Justice Development .............................................................................................................................................. 21

Resources .............................................................................................................................................. 23

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WH A T I S D I V E R S I T Y , EQU I T Y , AN D I N C L U S I ON ( D E I ) ?

Diversity is the presence of differences that may include race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic status, language, (dis)ability, age, religious commitment, or political perspective. Populations that have been-and remain- underrepresented among practitioners in the field and marginalized in the broader society.

Equity is promoting justice, impartiality and fairness within the procedures, processes, and distribution of resources by institutions or systems. Tackling equity issues requires an understanding of the root causes of outcome disparities within our society.

Inclusion is an outcome to ensure those that are diverse actually feel and/or are welcomed. Inclusion outcomes are met when you, your institution, and your program are truly inviting to all. To the degree to which diverse individuals are able to participate fully in the decision-making processes and development opportunities within an organization or group.

Welcome

It is here where we encourage innovative change. While change might seem hard, especially related to diversity, equity, and inclusion, it is not impossible; it requires strong change agents (a village) and YOU! We encourage you and your village to be the change you want to see. This tool has: resources, discussion, and expert interactions that will aide you in your change management journey. Go ahead, explore, innovate, and continue to build the change you want to see. — Shatomi Luster-Edward, Ed.D.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQ0doKfhecQ

How Can You Use This Publ ication to Promote DEI?

You may want to get ideas for a program that you are starting or implementing. Or you may want to know what is being done in the Extension DEI program area. In either case, you have come to the right place! This publication is designed to give you quick access to information, experts, training, and resources that can help you develop or conceptualize your program. Not involved in a program yet? This publication will give you an excellent foundation for understanding the topic, and perhaps inspiring you to start a program.

This publication includes a wealth of resources, curated from a range of organizations. We suggest resources in each section of the publication, and provide a complete list of those referenced in the Resources section.

This First Edition publication for the Extension Foundation Impact Collaborative Summit of April 2019 was designed to support IC Summit participants and is intended to be a tool that can provide a bridge of information through program development and evaluation. A second edition of this publication was developed in preparation for the October 2019 Impact Collaborative Summit.

Be part of the collective wisdom of this community in promoting DEI!

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A B OU T U S

“Cooperative Extension has an opportunity to support civic dialogue around issues of diversity and inclusion, and adhere to our mission of bringing evidenced-based information into the public arena to address these important issues.”

— Chuck Hibberd, ECOP Chair, Dean/Director Nebraska Extension, University of Nebraska – Lincoln

Diversity, Equi ty, and Inclusion Chairs

The following members are serving as Chairs of the Extension Organizing Committee on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion:

Dr. Shatomi Luster-Edward, Co-Chair: CES/External Program

Terry Meisenbach, Co-Chair: Administration Communication

University of Missouri Urban County Director

Extension Foundation Administration

Extension 2018 Summit Presentation

Ana Lu Fonseca, Chair: Assessment & Accountability

Dr. Ahlishia Jnae Shipley, Co-Chair: Administration Communication

Assistant Director of DEI, Oregon State University

National Program leader, USDA

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Margaret Sage, Co-Chair: CES/External Program

Woodie Hughes, Jr., Chair: Listen and Learn

University of WI, Extension, 4-H Youth Development

Assistant Extension Administrator/State 4-H Program Leader, Fort Valley State University

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Organizing Committee

The following list represents all members of the Extension Organizing Committee on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion:

Name

Title

About

Lindsey Lunsford

DEI Fellow

DEI Extension Fellow

Shatomi Luster-Edward University of Missouri Urban County Director www.shatomi.me

Terry Meisenbach

Extension Foundation Administration

https://www.linkedin.com/in/terry-meisenbach-9ab45710/

Chris Geith

Extension Foundation CEO

CEO Extension Foundation

Sheron Fulson

Senator Curls Chief of Staff

https://www.senate.mo.gov/mem09/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/ sheron-fulson-8b648b176/

Dr. Chiquita Miller

K-State Extension Agent

http://www.wyandotte.k-state.edu/about/staff/index.html

Valencia Broadus

MU Extension Council, Chair and Attorney

http://extension.missouri.edu/jackson/ council.aspx

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Ahlishia Shipley

National Program Leader, USDA

https://nifa.usda.gov/ahlishia-shipley

Ana Lu Fonseca

Assistant Director of DEI, Oregon State University, Outreach and Engagement

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/employee/ ana-lu-fonseca

Mark Locklear

Web Developer, Extension Foundation

Technology Solutions Team

Dr. Pamala Morris

Purdue, Assistant Dean/Director, Office of Multicultural Programs, Professor, Youth Development and Ag. Education

Overview for Dr. Pamala Morris

Project Director, eXtension, CoP “Diversity, Equi ty, and Inclusion”

Karima Samadi

Program Manager OSU Extension College of Education and Human Ecology, College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences

https://fic.osu.edu/members/directory/s/ samadi-karima.html

Jauqua Wilkins

Urban League of Greater Kansas City

https://www.ulkc.org/our-team

Peggy Ehlers

Purdue University, Extension, 4-H Youth

https://extension.purdue.edu/Dearborn/ profile/pehlers

Margaret Sage

University of WI, Extension, 4-H Youth Development

https://sauk.extension.wisc.edu/staff-directory/

Dr. Courtney T. Owens

Kentucky State University, Interim Assistance Extension Administrator

http://kysu.edu/directory/bio/courtney-owens/

Davi Mozie

Cornell University Cooperative Extension, Reentry Educator

http://ccetompkins.org/staff/davi-mozie

Kenneth J. Schlather

Cornell University Cooperative Extension, Executive Director

https://fellows.atkinson.cornell.edu/view.php?NetID=ks47

Kenneth Earl McLaurin

Cornell University Cooperative Extension, Financial Management Educator

http://ccetompkins.org/staff/kenneth-mclaurin-jr

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Eduardo Gonzalez

Cornell University Cooperative Extension

https://www.human.cornell.edu/people/eg36

Letitia (Tish) Johnson

University of Missouri Cooperative Extension, Community Development

https://extension2.missouri.edu/people/ letitia-tish-johnson-138

Dr. Angela Allen, Ph.D.

University of Wisconsin Extension, Associate Professor & Communities Educator

https://milwaukee.extension.wisc.edu/community- development/

Woodie Hughes

Fort Valley State University, College of Agriculture, Family Sciences and Technology, Cooperative Extension Program

http://www.fvsu.edu/staff/woodie-hughes/

Steve Wagoner

Purdue Extension, County Extension Director https://extension.purdue.edu/marion/ profile/wagoners

Nia Imani Fields, Ed.D.

University of Maryland Extension, 4-H Specialist, Curricular Systems & Program Development

https://www.niaimanifields.com/

http://extension.umd.edu/4-h

Matt Pezold, MS, MA

University of Missouri Extension, Urban West Region, Labor and Workforce Development Specialist

https://extension2.missouri.edu/people/ matthew-pezold-85251

Tony Franklin

University of Illinois Extension, Associate Director for Extension Field Operations

https://www.linkedin.com/in/tony-franklin-77b05111/

Adegoke Adetunji

Purdue University, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction

https://www.education.purdue.edu/about/ diversity-initiatives/holmes-scholars-program/

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F R AM EWO R K S

“Our opportunity to be consistent in our commitment to diversity and inclusion in all Extension programming is now.”

— Chuck Hibberd, ECOP Chair, Dean/Director Nebraska Extension, University of Nebraska – Lincoln

What’s in a Framework?

As you continue to explore diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), it is important that you have a "guide or blueprint" that conceptualizes the designed approach and associated literature attributed to this subject matter. Three frameworks have molded this designed approach of DEI, to also include associated experts. It is important to: understand truth, how to heal, how to effectively implement DEI in learning environments, understand the importance of dialogue, and know how to change the optics. The researched ontology provides framework guidance.

Dr. Gail Christopher

Dr. Juanita Cleaver-Simmons

Framework for

Framework for

Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation

Diverse Learning Environments

Watch Dr. Cleaver-Simmons Online

Watch Dr. Christopher Online

Review Dr. Christopher’s Presentation

Review Dr. Cleaver-Simmons Presentation

Dr. M. Cade Smith

Framework for

Community Dialogues for Racial Healing

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D E I COM P E T E N C Y A R E A S

APLU prohibits discrimination against any individual on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or ancestry, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, or status as a veteran.

— M. Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public Land Grant Universities, March 24, 2010

What are Competencies?

Competencies are the skills, knowledge, abilities, and behaviors that describe the standard to which a competent person is expected to perform. This tool addresses five primary competencies associated with Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion:

Understanding Implicit Bias

• Microaggression Development and Understanding

Cultural Competency

Promotion of Civility

Social Justice Development

Continue to the section on each competency to learn more, and use the category search feature on the right to locate resources that address each one.

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Understanding Impl icit Bias

Whereas, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), a voluntary association whose membership consists of public research universities, land-grant institutions, state university systems and other affiliated organizations is committed to advancing diversity and inclusion by exercising the principles of equal access and equal opportunity in education and employment.

— M. Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public Land Grant Universities, March 24, 2010

What is Implicit Bias?

Also known as implicit social cognition, implicit bias refers to the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. These biases, which encompass both favorable and unfavorable assessments, are activated involuntarily and without an individual’s awareness or intentional control. Residing deep in the subconscious, these biases are different from known biases that individuals may choose to conceal for the purposes of social and/or political correctness. Rather, implicit biases are not accessible through introspection. — Excerpted from Kirwan Institute at Ohio State University

https://youtu.be/DIV7vlMi4kc

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https://youtu.be/nFbvBJULVnc

https://youtu.be/EQACkg5i4AY

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Other important resources on Implicit Bias

Defining Implicit Bias

• Combating Implicit Bias in the Workplace • More curated resources on Implicit Bias •

How to Survive a Difficult Conversation: Race Ahead • Doing Our Own Work: Anti-Racism for White People • Project Ready • Critical Practices for Anti-Bias Education • Resources to Promote Belonging and Inclusion • Anti-Racist Organizational Change: Resources and Tools for Nonprofits • The Black Presence in the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service Since 1945 • Youth Development Champion Groups • Emotional Intelligence on Generations • Increasing Cultural Awareness & Equity in Extension Programs: Online Modules • Dismantling Racism: White Supremacy Culture • Okun on White Supremacy Culture • Racial Taboo: The Edenton Experience • How to overcome our biases? Walk boldly toward them. • Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation • Collective Impact Resources • Understanding Collective Impact • Programs: Texas 4-H Mission Possible Camp • Programs: Together We Can • Programs: Iowa 4-H – From Inclusion to Belonging • Project Implicit • What Can I Do About Bias? • Tool for Organizational Self-Assessment Related to Racial Equity • Racial Equity Impact Assessment • Mapping Tools: Mapme • DEI Awareness Checklist • Study Shows How Children View Race Bias • Subconscious Racial Bias in Children • Do Your Assumptions Affect How You Treat People? • Institutional Interventions to Prevent Implicit Bias from Undermining Organizational Diversity

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Microaggression Development and Understanding

APLU takes seriously our leadership responsibility to provide equal access and equal opportunity through the development of policies and initiatives that foster academic excellence, diversity and inclusion.

— M. Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public Land Grant Universities, March 24, 2010

What is Microaggression?

Microaggressions are the everyday verbal, nonverbal, and environmental slights, snubs, or insults, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages to target persons based solely upon their marginalized group membership. — Excerpted from Diversity in the Classroom, UCLA Diversity and Faculty Development

The first step in addressing microaggressions is to recognize when a microaggression has occurred and what message it may be sending.

https://youtu.be/_85JVcniE_M

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Other Important Resources on Microaggression Development and Understanding:

• Microaggressions and Social Work Practice, Education, and Research • Tool: Recognizing Microaggressions and the Messages They Send • More curated resources on Microaggression Development and Understanding • How to Survive a Difficult Conversation: Race Ahead • Project Ready • Agribusiness Small Farm Diversity • Dismantling Racism: White Supremacy Culture • Okun on White Supremacy Culture • How to overcome our biases? Walk boldly toward them. • Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation • Collective Impact Resources • Understanding Collective Impact • Programs: Texas 4-H Mission Possible Camp • Programs: Together We Can • Programs: Iowa 4-H – From Inclusion to Belonging • Project Implicit • What Can I Do About Bias? • Tool for Organizational Self-Assessment Related to Racial Equity • Racial Equity Impact Assessment • Mapping Tools: Mapme • DEI Awareness Checklist

References: Garibay, J. C. (2014). Diversity in the classroom. UCLA Diversity & Faculty Development. p. 10-13. Retrieved from https://equity.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/DiversityintheClassroom2014Web.pdf

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Cultural Competency

APLU believes that human and intellectual diversity contribute to academic excellence, and that the Association and its member institutions benefit from the rich diversity of the persons who comprise our staff, faculty and students.

— M. Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public Land Grant Universities, March 24, 2010

What is Cultural Competency?

Cultural competency is associated and was recognized by the general and mental health industry and is the human behavior that incorporates communication, action, beliefs, thoughts and values of ethnicity, ethnic background, religious beliefs and social values (Luster, 2017). Cultural competence is action oriented through the capacity to effectively function and generate change. There are seven tenets of cultural competency: learning, acknowledge, awareness, knowledge, engage and integrate, revise and refine, and cultural competent (Gooden & Norman-Major, 2012).

https://youtu.be/Z934vT7xhh0

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Other Resources on Cultural Competency:

Defining Cultural Competency

• Communicating Cross-Culturally: What Teachers Should Know • The Role of Organizational Culture and Climate in Innovation and Effectiveness • Storytelling for Cultural Competence • More curated resources on Cultural Competency

Project Ready

o

o Critical Practices for Anti-Bias Education

Social Justice Standards

o

Equity and Empowerment Lens

o

o Resources to Promote Belonging and Inclusion

Social Justice Pedagogy

o

o A Social Justice Perspective on Youth and Community Development

o Guide to Mentoring Boys and Young Men of Color

Three Tools for Engaging Latino Youth

o

o 4-H as a Catalyst to Enhance Quality of Life for Hispanic Individuals

o Annotated Bibliography of Structural Racism in the U.S. Food System

References: Luster, S. N. (2017). Minorities in Higher Education: Their Status and Disparities in Student and Faculty Representation (Doctoral dissertation, University of Missouri). Retrieved from https://mospace.umsystem.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10355/61956/public.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

Edwards, F. L., Norman-Major, K. A., & Gooden, S. T. (2012). Cultural competency in disasters. Cultural competency for public administrators, 197-218.

Getha-Taylor, H., Holmes, M. H., & Moen, J. R. (2018). Evidence-Based Interventions for Cultural Competency Development Within Public Institutions. Administration & Society, 0095399718764332. p. 2. Retrieved from https://swoogo.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/47111-592846d15dccd.pdf

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Promotion of Civi l ity

“AP LU champions diversity, educational equity and the preparation of individuals who can live and work effectively in an increasingly multicultural and interdependent world.”

— M. Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public Land Grant Universities, March 24, 2010

What is Promotion of Civility?

“Civility is claiming and caring for one’s identity, needs and beliefs without degrading someone else’s in the process. ” – Tomas Spath and Cassandra Dahnke, Founders, Institute for Civility in Government

https://youtu.be/QijH4UAqGD8

Other important resources on Promotion of Civility:

Defining Civility

• Things to consider when including the 1st Amendment • More curated resources on Promotion of Civility • How to Survive a Difficult Conversation: Race Ahead • Doing Our Own Work: Allies for Change • Critical Practices for Anti-Bias Education

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Social Justice Standards

• Equity and Empowerment Lens – Multnomah County, OR • Talking About Race and Privilege Lesson Plan • Exploring Gender Stereotypes in Stories Lesson Plan • Race and Poverty Lesson Plan • Camp to Belong • Disparity: An Analysis of Funding Factors Affecting Black Academic Agriculture • Dismantling Racism: White Supremacy Culture • Racial Taboo: The Edenton Experience • Maryland 4-H Issue Forum • Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation • Organizational Culture and Climate • Collective Impact Resources • Understanding Collective Impact • Programs: Iowa 4-H • Project Implicit • What Can I Do About Bias? • Tool for Organizational Self-Assessment • Racial Equity Impact Assessment • Equity Assessment Worksheet • Mapping Tools – Mapme • DEI Awareness Checklist • Foundation Individual Rights in Education • Fire Free Speech History Podcast • Things to Consider When Including the 1 st Amendment • Get Comfortable with Being Uncomfortable • Defining Civility • Defining DEI • Extension Foundation’s Civil Dialogue Website

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Social Justice Development

APLU is committed to recruiting and retaining, on a nondiscriminatory basis, people who are members of groups that have been historically underrepresented in higher education and to supporting its members in their efforts to enhance the diversity of their faculty, staff and students.

— M. Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public Land Grant Universities, March 24, 2010

What is Social Justice?

Synthesizing the social justice discourse in educational leadership, Furman and Gruenewald (2004) offer three shared meanings of social justice embedded in various ways throughout contemporary literature: critical-humanist perspective, focus on school achievement and economic well-being, and the narratives and values of the Western Enlightenment (see also Brooks, 2008b). The increased attention given to social justice brings to fore a focus on the moral purposes of leadership in schools and how to achieve these purposes (Furman, 2003). As Evans (2007) observed, the scholarship of social justice supports the notion that educational leaders have a social and moral obligation to foster equitable school practices, processes, and outcomes for learners of different racial, socioeconomic, gender, cultural, disability, and sexual orientations backgrounds (Jean-Marie, Normore, & Brooks, 2009).

https://youtu.be/Wtroop739uU

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Other important resources on Social Justice:

Defining Social Justice

• Leadership for Social Justice: Preparing 21st Century School Leaders for a New Social Order • Everyday Racism — Algebra or Pre-Algebra? • More curated resources on Social Justice Development • 2019 Kids Count Data Book • Critical Practices for Anti-Bias Education • Social Justice Standards • Equity and Empowerment (Racial Justice Focus) • Equity and Empowerment – Multnomah County, OR • Taking About Race and Privilege Lesson Plan • Resources to Promote Belonging and Inclusion • Social Justice Pedagogy in Urban Education and Youth Development • A Social Justice Perspective on Youth and Community Development • Agents of Change: Youth Development and Social Justice Activism • Exploring Gender Stereotypes in Stories Lesson Plan • The Cycle of Poverty Lesson Plan

References: Brooks, J. S. (2008b). Freedom and justice: Conceptual and empirical possibilities for the study and practice of educational leadership. In I. Bogotch, F. Beachum, J. Blount, J. S. Brooks, & F. W. English, Radicalizing educational leadership: Toward a theory of social justice (pp. 61-78). Netherlands: Sense.

Evans, A. E. (2007). Horton, Highlander, and leadership education: Lessons for preparing educational leaders for social justice, Journal of School Leadership, 17, 250-275.

Furman, G. C. (2003). The 2002 UCEA presidential address: Toward a new scholarship of educational leadership? UCEA Review, 45(1), 1-6.

Furman, G. C. & Gruenewald, D. A. (2004). Expanding the landscape of social justice: A critical ecological analysis. Educational Administration Quarterly, 40(1), 47-76.

Jean-Marie, G., Normore, A. H., & Brooks, J. S. (2009). Leadership for social justice: Preparing 21st century school leaders for a new social order. Journal of Research on Leadership Education, 4(1), 1-31. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ875408.pdf.

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R E S OU R C E S

ECOP encourages all Cooperative Extension programs to adhere to their Land- grant University nondiscrimination policy in the development and delivery of Extension efforts designed to engage all people.

— Chuck Hibberd, ECOP Chair, Dean/Director Nebraska Extension, University of Nebraska – Lincoln

Note: We’ve collected all the resources referenced earlier in this publication in this section.

Extension Foundation’s Civil Dialogue Website A resource curated by the ECOP Rapid Response team for Civil Discourse on Race Relations. The site documents the April 2017 report and organizes all of the useful resources submitted by partners. The team also developed a competency framework that may be used for training. URL: https://civildialogue.extension.org/

Defining DEI

What is Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion?

Diversity is the presence of difference that may include race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic status, language, (dis)ability, age, religious commitment, or political perspective.

Equity is the process of fairness. The policy that one would implement to ensure processes and procedures promote justness and impartiality

Inclusion is an outcome to ensure those that are diverse actually feel and/or are welcomed. Are you, the institution, and your program inviting? URL: https://diversity.umich.edu/about/defining-dei/

Defining Cultural Competency and the Health Industry

A resource curated by Shatomi Luster-Edward outlining the research of cultural competency in relation to the health industry. URL: https://mospace.umsystem.edu/xmlui/handle/10355/61956

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Communicating Cross-Culturally: What Teachers Should Know

A publication curated by Pratt-Johnson. This article looks at the need for teachers to be culturally responsive and competent as schools and classrooms become increasingly linguistically and culturally diverse. It highlights five points of cultural difference with which all teachers should be aware when teaching students of diverse backgrounds. URL: http://iteslj.org/Articles/Pratt-Johnson-CrossCultural.html

Defining Implicit Bias

A resource curated by the Kirwan Institute understanding the characteristics of Implicit Bias. URL: http://kirwaninstitute.osu.edu/research/understanding-implicit-bias/

Institutional Interventions to Prevent Implicit Bias from Undermining Organizational Diversity

A resource curated by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity URL: http://kirwaninstitute.osu.edu/combatting-implicit-bias-in-the-workplace/

Do Your Assumptions Affect How You Treat People?

A video produced by Soul Pancake URL: https://youtu.be/DIV7vlMi4kc

Subconscious Racial Bias in Children

A CNN produced interview by Anderson Cooper details a 7th grader whose answers to similar scenarios differ depending on the race of the characters. URL: https://youtu.be/nFbvBJULVnc

Study Shows How Children View Race Bias

A CNN produced interview by Anderson Cooper highlights a project that reveals how children view racial beliefs, attitudes and preferences. URL: https://youtu.be/EQACkg5i4AY

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Defining Microaggression / Tool: Recognizing Microaggressions and the Messages They Send

A document curated by UCLA's Diversity's Faculty and Development. Adapted from Sue, Derald Wing, Microaggressions in Everyday Life: Race, Gender and Sexual Orientation, Wiley & Sons, 2010. URL: https://academicaffairs.ucsc.edu/events/documents/Microaggressions_Examples_Arial_2014_11_12.p df

Microaggressions and Social Work Practice, Education, and Research

An editorial article by Michael S. Spencer, School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA To cite this article: Michael S. Spencer (2017) Microaggressions and Social Work Practice, Education, and Research, Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work, 26:1-2, 1-5, DOI: 10.1080/15313204.2016.1268989 URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/15313204.2016.1268989

Racial Microaggressions: Comments That Sting | The New York Times

Across college campuses and social media, younger generations have started to challenge those fleeting comments that seem innocent but leave uneasy feelings behind.

A Watch Retro Report on NYTimes.com. New York Times published. URL: https://youtu.be/_85JVcniE_M

Defining Civility A document and definition curated by the Institute for Civility in Government URL: https://www.instituteforcivility.org/who-we-are/what-is-civility/

Get comfortable with being uncomfortable | Luvvie Ajayi

Luvvie Ajayi isn't afraid to speak her mind or to be the one dissenting voice in a crowd, and neither should you. "Your silence serves no one," says the writer, activist and self-proclaimed professional troublemaker. In this bright, uplifting talk, Ajayi shares three questions to ask yourself if you're teetering on the edge of speaking up or quieting down -- and encourages all of us to get a little more comfortable with being uncomfortable. URL: https://youtu.be/QijH4UAqGD8

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Things to consider when including the 1st Amendment

Understanding the importance of Freedom of Speech in consideration with Title VI, Title VII, and Title IX.

• Education and Title VI (6) [prohibits discrimination based on color, race, and national origin]

• Title VII (7) [relief against discrimination]

Title IX (9) [sex]

URL: https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/hq43e4.html; https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/tit levii.cfm; https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/tix_dis.html?exp=0

Foundation Individual Rights in Education

Curated by the fire.org (Foundation Individual Rights in Education). These resources outline ones rights to their freedom of speech in relation to civility.

First Amendment Library

Pod Cast/Freedom of Speech

URL: https://www.thefire.org/first-amendment-library/; https://www.thefire.org/free-speech-history- podcast/

Defining Social Justice / Racism is a Public Health Crisis

Synthesizing the social justice discourse in educational leadership, Furman and Gruenewald (2004) offer three shared meanings of social justice embedded in various ways throughout contemporary literature:

critical-humanist perspective,

• focus on school achievement and economic well-being, • and the narratives and values of the Western Enlightenment (see also Brooks, 2008b).

The increased attention given to social justice brings to fore a focus on the moral purposes of leadership in schools and how to achieve these purposes (Furman, 2003). As Evans (2007) observed, the scholarship of social justice supports the notion that educational leaders have a social and moral obligation to foster equitable school practices, processes, and outcomes for learners of different racial, socioeconomic, gender, cultural, disability, and sexual orientations backgrounds (p. 250). URL: https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.wpha.org/resource/resmgr/2018_folder/WPHA_Racial_Equity_Resolutio. pdf

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Leadership for Social Justice: Preparing 21st Century School Leaders for a New Social Order

Research curated by: Gaetane Jean-Marie, University of Oklahoma Anthony H. Normore, California State University, Dominguez Hills, and Jeffrey S. Brooks University of Missouri URL: https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ875408.pdf

Social justice -- is it still relevant in the 21st century? | Charles L. Robbins | TEDxSBU

Pervasive injustice has society at a turning point. Every individual has a choice to make - you can either stand with me and fight for social justice, or you can stay on the sidelines silently supporting the systems that perpetuate the inequality, violence, and poverty that plague our world. This talk highlights some of the most critical social justice issues of our time and calls on everyone to stand up and play a part in changing the world.

TEDx: This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. URL: https://youtu.be/Wtroop739uU

Everyday Racism – Algebra or Pre-Algebra?

Narrator: Tony is an African American student about to begin high school. He wants to be the first in his family to attend college and hopes to be a biologist. He did well in middle school and took advanced math. But he didn’t score well on the school district’s new high school placement exam. Compared to white students, most Black and Latino students don't score as well on this exam. The students of color mostly come from two middle schools, known as the worst schools in the district in the poorest part of town. They’re overcrowded and have th e least qualified teachers. When Tony enrolled at the high school, he was referred to Mr. Perez, the guidance counselor. He was happy Mr. Perez was Latino since most teachers at the high school are white.

Mr. Perez:

Tony, you seem like a good student but I'd recommend that you enroll in the Pre-Algebra class

instead of the regular Algebra class.

Narrator:

Mr. Perez, for years, has been routinely advising most African American and Latino students to

take Pre-Algebra because a lot of them fail regular Algebra.

Tony: But I've already taken advanced math class in middle school. And I know that Algebra is a requirement before I can take any science classes.

Mr. Perez:

I’d really like to help you, but the school district has new testing policies— if you don ’t score

well on the placement exam, you can’t take Algebra. That’s the rules.

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Narrator: Mr. Perez didn’t have the heart to tell Tony that his chances of getting into the local college were not good because you need three high school science classes. If you take Pre-Algebra freshman year and regular Algebra sophomore year, you’d have to take all three science classes in your last two years of high school. After meeting with Mr. Perez, Tony talked to his friend Jason, one of the few white students who attended the same junior high school as Tony.

Jason:

Are we gonna be in Algebra class together?

Tony: I guess not. They’re making me take Pre - Algebra because of my placement test scores. It’s the new policy and I don’t have a choice.

Jason:

Those te sts are messed up. Guess you can’t do much about it if those are the rules.

Narrator: Jason didn’t tell Tony that he had just overheard his white friends in the hall saying, "since mostly whites got into Algebra class, it proves they must be smarter." Tony then talked to his friend Nary, who is Cambodian, and one of the few Asian Americans at the school.

Nary: I have to take Pre- Algebra, too. I don’t have the brains to pass the regular Algebra class anyway. Who needs advanced math, anyway? I can get a better grade in home economics.

Narrator: As the day went on, Tony realized that most white students had, in fact, gotten into Algebra, while most students of color were assigned to Pre-Algebra. He felt angry, disappointed and embarrassed about his test s cores. He wasn’t sure if there was anything he could do. His excitement about beginning high school quickly began to fade.

Copyright: Racial Justice Leadership, by Terry Keleher, Race Forward

A Guide for Analyzing Different Levels of Racism

Instructions: Answer the five questions below. List in each box, examples of the level or racism you think is occurring in the scenario or situation you’re analyzing. You don’t have to identify every possible example because it’s important to leave ample time to address the last question.

1. What are examples of Internalized Racism (racism within individuals)?

2. What are examples of Interpersonal Racism (racism between individuals)?

3. What are examples of Institutional Racism (racism within institutions and systems of power)?

4. What are examples of Structural Racism * (racism among institutions and across society)?

5. What is a proposed solution that could produce institutional change in this scenario?

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________________________________________________

* Note: Structural racism includes history, culture, interacting institutions and policies, and racial ideology –– for example: common norms and myths, popular cultural images and stereotypes, the compounding effects of other institutions, etc.

Copyright: Racial Justice Leadership, by Terry Keleher, Race Forward URL: http://raceforward.org/

DEI Awareness Checklist

A resource/checklist curated by Shatomi Luster-Edward for Extension Foundation outlining the importance of DEI awareness.

☐ Gender Awareness ☐ Geographical Location ☐ Race

☐ Ethnicity ☐ Language ☐ Culture ☐ Gender Identity

☐ Developmental and Acquired Disabilities ☐ Faith-based beliefs (religions or spiritual) ☐ Sexual Orientation ☐ Socio-economic Status ☐ Variability in Language Skills and/or Reading Level ☐ Program Implementation: Braille, Large Print, Sound/Audio, and Translations ☐ ADA Compliance

Compiled from US Department of Health and Human Services resources.

Incorporating DEI in Your Grant-Making Process

This Medium piece provides tips and best practices for incorporating DEI in grant-making. URL: https://medium.com/dei-in-grant-making/incorporating-diversity-equity-and-inclusion-in-your-grant- making-process-a-checklist-of-ee73992c93de

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Mapping Tools

Mapme URL: https://mapme.com/education

Equity Assessment Worksheet

This assessment gives participants the opportunity to gather evidence, engage in dialog and evaluate practices and procedures to determine a baseline for work related to equity. This assessment reflects the development of the Oregon Community College’s Inclusion and Diversity Consortium’s (IDC) Best Practices of Equitable and Inclusive Campuses. URL: http://occa17.com/data/documents/Equity-Assessment-Instructions-and-Worksheet-for-COCC.pdf

Racial Equity Impact Assessment

Curated by Race Forward: A Racial Equity Impact Assessment (REIA) is a systematic examination of how different racial and ethnic groups will likely be affected by a proposed action or decision. URL: https://www.raceforward.org/sites/default/files/RacialJusticeImpactAssessment_v5.pdf

Tool for Organizational Self-Assessment Related to Racial Equity

Curated by the Coalition of Communities of Color and All Hands Raised, this tool is for Organizational Self- Assessment Related to Racial Equity. URL: https://racc.org/wp-content/uploads/buildingblocks/foundation/CCC%20- %20Tool%20for%20Organizational%20Self-Assessment%20Related%20to%20Racial%20Equity.pdf

What Can I Do About Bias

The Kirwan Institute worked with MTV to create a seven-day race and gender bias cleanse. It provides daily tasks that will help you de-bias yourself. URL: http://www.lookdifferent.org/what-can-i-do/bias-cleanse

Project Implicit

Curated by Harvard University: Whichever IAT you do, we will ask you (optionally) to report your attitudes toward or beliefs about these topics, and provide some general information about yourself. URL: https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/takeatest.html

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Programs: Iowa 4-H: From Inclusion to Belonging

Photo credit: John-Paul Chaisson-Cárdenas

One-in-five school age (K-12) youth in Iowa is of color, and 4-H membership should mirror this trend. Thus, in 2014, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach 4-H Youth Development began to move from the concept of inclusion of diverse youth to belonging. Iowa 4-H has created four Culturally-based Youth Leadership Accelerators (CYLAs) that mobilize cultural strengths and culturally based narratives to introduce and strengthen the relationship between youth and 4-H. The CYLAs also connect underrepresented youth, whose families may be unfamiliar with post-secondary education, to the college experience. Each CYLA includes a day at the Iowa State University campus, an overnight experience, and a day of culturally-based workshops with embedded 4-H program priorities: Healthy Living, STEM, Citizenship and Leadership, and Communication and the Arts. Much of the curriculum is entrenched in ethnic or cultural literature and research. In only two years, CYLAs have brought more than 500 young leaders of color into Iowa 4-H. In some cases, the youth have joined existing 4-H clubs and learning communities. Many more have worked with volunteers to develop new culturally-based clubs. CYLA graduates also have helped lead statewide programming. URL: https://www.extension.iastate.edu/4h/files/page/files/CYLAs%20FAQ%20Sheet%20for%20Counties_0 .pdf

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Programs: Helping Standing Rock Youth Succeed

Photo credit: Sue Isbell

Sue Isbell delivers 4-H and youth development programming in Sioux County, North Dakota, which serves members of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The people of the Standing Rock are affected by severe poverty, high levels of diabetes and obesity, and low graduation rates. Only 10 percent of ninth grade students graduate in one district, with 80 percent dropping out before the end of their senior year. Isbell’s work to establish an embroidery and silkscreen business at a local high school has built business skills among students, and improved the economy of the county. Her work to establish community gardens has improved access to fresh fruits and vegetables in hopes of reducing rates of food-related diseases. Sue Isbell’s work has brought greater awareness of Native American issues to her colleagues in the North Dakota State University Extension Service, as well as real-world examples of how to design and implement successful Extension programs for tribal audiences. Her programs for tribal audiences build trust with tribal members as well as knowledge of tribal history and culture. URL: https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/siouxcountyextension

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Programs: Together We Can

Photo credit: Todd Johnson-OSU Communications

Unidos Se Puede, formerly Juntos, is a culturally-appropriate prevention program being delivered to 300 Latino immigrant families in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Designed to increase academic performance and reduce substance use and other common negative behaviors, Unidos promotes family engagement, success coaching, and positive peer affiliations through year-round activities. Participating families have shown significant increases in positive parenting behaviors and decreases in youth alcohol and drug use. Students also increased their GPAs by 29 percent, and decreased tardiness and absences by 23 percent and 33 percent, respectively. Unidos is widely accepted by both the families and the school systems where implemented, and is poised to become a model for helping communities across the United States address the needs of their growing Latino immigrant populations. Dr. Ronald Cox, Oklahoma State University researcher and Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service specialist, launched Unidos in response to a general lack of programs designed to meet the unique needs of shifting Latino migration patterns where new settlement communities are poorly equipped to support immigrant populations.

NIFA supports this project through the Children, Youth, and Families at Risk program.

Institution: Oklahoma State Extension Service URL: https://humansciences.okstate.edu/hdfs/unidos/index.html

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Programs: Texas 4-H Mission Possible Camp

Photo Credit: B. Darlene Locke

Mission Possible is a co-educational, inclusive program that provides a residential summer camp experience for youth of differing abilities, bringing youth together to improve their abilities and to learn from each other. The three primary objectives are to include youth with medically-diagnosed disabilities in a traditional summer camp environment, educate 4-H members about disabilities, and prepare 4-H members to advocate for the disabled community. The program began in 2004 with funding from National 4- H Council’s Building Community Inclusion initiative aimed at providing an inclusive 4-H experience. In total, 538 youth have participated in the 13 camps; 238 youth with medically diagnosed disabilities and 300 4-H members serving as mentors. Mission Possible wins on two levels: campers have fun, just like any other youth, and 4-H youth who serve a s mentors gain valuable interpersonal skills. “These experiences have taught me to be a different kind of leader. I also learned that though people with special needs are often viewed as ‘disabled,’ their only real disability is a lack of acceptance.” – 4-H mentor.

Institution: Texas 4-H URL: https://texas4hcenter.tamu.edu/services/youth-camps-and-retreats/missionpossible/

Understanding Collective Impact

Since the 2011 Stanford Social Innovation Review article introduced the concept, collective impact has been widely adopted as an effective form of cross-sector collaboration to address complex social and environmental challenges. Though collective impact has proven to be a powerful approach in tackling a wide range of issues in communities all over the world, many practitioners are searching for the tools they need to be successful in this work. The thought leadership and resources in sections of this website will help you build a foundation for doing this work. URL: http://www.collectiveimpactforum.org/getting-started

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impact.extension.org

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